The Reality of Interventions

BlogArticlesThe Reality of Interventions

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At Sobriety.ca Foundation, we offer several services above our therapeutic addiction treatment programs. Whether you are a friend, family member, coworker, or boss, often it’s hard to know what to do to help. Sobriety.ca Foundation is here to guide you.

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Listen to Gary, one of our many success stories, describe his experience with us:

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Over the last few days, we’ve been discussing Interventions quite a bit. Truth be told, we are in the process of completely revamping the website; the results of which you should be seeing very soon. As part of this process, we’ve been going over all of our existing web pages, assessing and updating content, which always leads us to wider conversations.

Conversations this week always lead back to Interventions.

And as with many topics in our field as of late, the sudden and inexplicable death of Michael Jackson has pushed many issues to center stage. Today, The New York Times published an article looking at the world of interventions–from the world of reality television to the reality of tough love.

Michael Jackson is an interesting case. Despite his unparalleled fame, his story is similar to many others. According to those from within his inner-sanctum, he was surrounded by enablers. And like most addicts, conversations about his alleged prescription drug addiction ended in denial, as recently confessed by his close friend Deepak Chopra.

An addict’s denial is their last coping mechanism–it is the security blanket shielding them from the immensity of their addiction and the fear of having to give it up. An addict will fight with every last ounce of energy they have to keep their addiction. “This is what keeps me company now. It doesn’t demand anything of me. It doesn’t promise me anything, nothing at all,” confessed one addict in a story we shared last week.

The death of Michael Jackson, say many in the field, is a classic case of missed opportunity–the opportunity to save a loved one, that is. An individual’s Unit–the inner circle of family members, loved ones, and those closest to us in this world–must break through an addict’s denial. This is possibly the hardest job you will ever have.

There are many varied school of interventionist thought. At Heritage Home, we recognize the many approaches to all of the stages of addiction and recovery, and believe in custom-designing a plan that incorporates varied approaches to fit the specifics of the individual.

However, no matter the approach, we believe that an intervention should always involve the Unit. Our team of interventionists work closely with the Unit to design a successful treatment plan, which can include the intervention, rehabilitation, individual and family counseling, and post-treatment care. The goal is to heal not just the individual but the Unit.

Before, during, and after the intervention, everyone involved is supported and guided through the process by a highly-experienced, trained professional who will come to you. Interventions can be easily derailed by an addicts denial, spawning feelings of anger, blame, guilt, and hurt. An interventionist is there to support all participants, including the addict, helping you to break through the wall of denial and, ultimately, put everyone on the path to healing and recovery.

In the end, the family members, friends, significant others, loved ones of all forms, and the addict are all in the cycle of addiction together. Dynamics between individuals and the group need to heal and evolve in order for all to carry forward. All, therefore, need to heal both individually and as a group.

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Sobriety Foundation

The Reality of Interventions

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